Deepak Narayanan

Final-Year PhD Student, Stanford University

Deepak Narayanan is a final-year PhD student at Stanford University advised by Prof. Matei Zaharia. He is interested in designing and building software to improve the runtime performance and efficiency of emerging machine learning and data analytics workloads on modern hardware. Before Stanford, he completed his SB and MEng from MIT.

Past sessions

Large language models have led to state-of-the-art accuracies across a range of tasks. However, training these large models efficiently is challenging for two reasons: a) GPU memory capacity is limited, making it impossible to fit large models on a single GPU or even on a multi-GPU server; and b) the number of compute operations required to train these models can result in unrealistically long training times. New methods of model parallelism such as tensor and pipeline parallelism have been proposed to address these challenges; unfortunately, naive usage leads to fundamental scaling issues at thousands of GPUs due to various reasons, e.g., expensive cross-node communication or idle periods waiting on other devices.

In this work, we show how to compose different types of parallelism methods (tensor, pipeline, and data parallelism) to scale to thousands of GPUs, achieving a two-order-of-magnitude increase in the sizes of models we can efficiently train compared to existing systems. We discuss various implementations of pipeline parallelism and propose a novel schedule that can improve throughput by more than 10% with comparable memory footprint compared to previously-proposed approaches. We quantitatively study the trade-offs between tensor, pipeline, and data parallelism, and provide intuition as to how to configure distributed training of a large model. The composition of these techniques allows us to perform training iterations on a model with 1 trillion parameters at 502 petaFLOP/s on 3072 GPUs with achieved per-GPU throughput of 52% of peak; previous efforts to train similar-sized models achieve much lower throughput (36% of theoretical peak). Our code has been open-sourced at https://github.com/nvidia/megatron-lm.

In this session watch:
Deepak Narayanan, Final-Year PhD Student, Stanford University

[daisna21-sessions-od]

Summit Europe 2020 Generalized Pipeline Parallelism for DNN Training

November 18, 2020 04:00 PM PT

DNN training is extremely time-consuming, necessitating efficient multi-accelerator parallelization. Current approaches to parallelizing training primarily use intra-batch parallelization, where a single iteration of training is split over the available workers, but suffer from diminishing returns at higher worker counts. We present PipeDream, a system that adds inter-batch pipelining to intra-batch parallelism to further improve parallel training throughput, helping to better overlap computation with communication and reduce the amount of communication when possible. Unlike traditional pipelining, DNN training is bi-directional, where a forward pass through the computation graph is followed by a backward pass that uses state and intermediate data computed during the forward pass.

Naïve pipelining can thus result in mismatches in state versions used in the forward and backward passes, or excessive pipeline flushes and lower hardware efficiency. To address these challenges, PipeDream versions model parameters for numerically correct gradient computations, and schedules forward and backward passes of different mini batches concurrently on different workers with minimal pipeline stalls. PipeDream also automatically partitions DNN layers among workers to balance work and minimize communication.

Extensive experimentation with a range of DNN tasks, models, and hardware configurations shows that PipeDream trains models to high accuracy up to 5.3X faster than commonly used intra-batch parallelism techniques, and also supports model training that does not fit on a single worker due to memory capacity constraints.

Speaker: Deepak Narayanan